Pat Nolan Blog

Man overboard – Porter side

Accidents such as this were not uncommon in the early days of large-scale commercial brewing when the dangers of inhaling carbon dioxide in poorly ventilated areas were not fully understood

A new book out  – Beamish & Crawford – The History of an Irish Brewery by Donal and Diarmuid Ó Drisceoil – contains the following extract from the Hibernian Chronicle newspaper dated 19th July 1792:

‘This day, as Daniel Murphy, one of the men engaged in our Porter-brewery, was reaching across the Tun for a stick, the effluvia of the liquor instantly suffocated him and he fell into the Tun quite dead. The entire of the Porter, which was of considerable value, was immediately thrown into the sewer in Cramer’s-square, by order of the Proprieters’.

Decent skins even back then, then….

This was in the first year of brewing at Beamish & Crawford’s Cork Porter Brewery.

Accidents such as this were not uncommon in the early days of large-scale commercial brewing when the dangers of inhaling carbon dioxide in poorly ventilated areas were not fully understood.

An extract from the Hibernian Chronicle newspaper dated 18th July 1792, contained in Beamish & Crawford – The History of an Irish Brewery by Donal and Diarmuid Ó Drisceoil.

An extract from the Hibernian Chronicle newspaper dated 18th July 1792, contained in Beamish & Crawford – The History of an Irish Brewery by Donal and Diarmuid Ó Drisceoil.

 

 

 

Sign up for Drinks Industry Ireland

Get a free weekly update on Drinks Industry trade news, direct to your inbox. Sign up now, it's Free