Off-trade

Internet has decreased wine knowledge

Consumers in China and the US experienced a sharp decline in “wine knowledge” between 2015 and 2019 whereas Australia and Japan have seen the highest growth in “involvement” in the wine category over the last five years, according to Wine Intelligence’s recently-published 2020 Global Trends report.

 

Despite decreasing levels of wine knowledge, the world’s wine consumers seem to care more about the category.

Despite decreasing levels of wine knowledge, the world’s wine consumers seem to care more about the category.

In Japan, the percentage of wine consumers who’re “highly involved” in the category has risen from 36% in 2015 to 41% in 2019, with Australia’s “high involved” wine population rising from 30% to 36% of all adult monthly wine drinkers

The Global Trends report discloses how consumers in the world’s major consumption markets for wine have become increasingly involved with the wine category. Conversely their wine knowledge has decreased however, most likely due to the diminished need to retain facts and the increased accessibility of immediate, at-hand information via smartphones. The knowledge index for Chinese consumers fell six points from 34.7 to 28.6 and US consumers saw a similar index drop from 34.2 to 28.8.

But despite decreasing levels of wine knowledge, the world’s wine consumers seem to care more about the category.

One of the consistent findings across markets is that female wine drinkers have at least the same or even higher levels of wine knowledge – while often less involved in the category – compared to men, especially in English-speaking markets.

The report also found that Premium wine drinkers, or those spending over $15 (€13.61) in the off-trade at least once a month, are not substantially more knowledgeable about wine compared to non-Premium wine drinkers.

Nevertheless Premium wine drinkers are more confident with wine than other drinkers, with Premium wine drinkers in the US and UK scoring over seven points higher on Wine Intelligence’s wine confidence index than non-Premium wine drinkers – based on the extent to which consumers feel competent about their wine knowledge.

“Until relatively recently wine used to be seen by many people as complex and intimidating,” said Lulie Halstead, Chief Executive of Wine Intelligence, “Thanks in part to the information revolution, consumer confidence in wine is on an upward trajectory which will hearten all those producers and brand-owners who can offer high quality products alongside compelling brand stories.

“The corollary to this seems to be that we no longer need to carry round lots of knowledge in our heads – we can be more adventurous without as much prior research. This will bring challenges to more long-established wine producers and production areas, which will have to fight harder to retain their historic dominance of the category.”

To purchase this report e-mail Courtney Abernathy.

 

 

 

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